Types of Wood Cuts for Hardwood Flooring


Types of Wood Cuts for Hardwood Flooring

Home renovations can feel daunting, especially when it comes to cost. Replacing old carpet can run deeply into your budget, but what if you decide to replace it with hardwood? Hardwood adds style, warmth, and value to your home—as well as durability. Here are the different types of wood cuts for hardwood flooring for your next flooring installation.

What Is Hardwood Flooring?

Wood is one of the most popular materials for flooring, and people have been using it in their homes for centuries. Due to its versatility in function and design, it gives every home a one-of-a-kind personality and beauty.

There are two kinds of wood floors: softwood and hardwood. Softwood includes materials harvested from abundant trees such as pine, fir, and cedar, which mature quickly. Hardwood is harvested from slower-growing trees, and it’s denser compared to softwood. It tends to last longer, and it has more durability.

Types of Hardwood Cut

When it comes to the different types of wood cuts for hardwood flooring, it comes down to preferences and styles. Each cut has its unique appearance but also changes the performance under various conditions.

Plain-Sawn

Also known as flat-sawn, plain-sawn is the most common cut used for hardwood flooring and most hardwood lumber products. The boards have 0- to 35-degree end-grain growth rings in a cathedral pattern. Plain-sawn has the greatest amount of lateral movement across the width of the board during seasonal changes.

Quarter-Sawn

Quarter-sawn has end-grain growth rings of 45 to 90 degrees, cut perpendicularly. The medullary rays of the lumber are split during the cutting process, causing a unique pattern to emerge.

Rift-Sawn

These boards have end grain with growth rings of 45 degrees to the surface, producing a very linear grain pattern. The lumber is made from the outer edge of the quarter-sawing process, working from the inside out.

Live-Sawn

The live-sawn is also called a “through-cut” with an end grain with 0- to 90-degree growth rings. It contains three different cut styles: cathedral, fleck, and linear. It’s generally more stable during seasonal changes and shrinks less on average compared to plain-sawn.

Cost and Installation

Thankfully, finding and installing hardwood isn’t complicated. You can find hardwood at your local home improvement retailer, which can also provide the parts and services you need. You can either install it yourself or hire a professional to do it for you.

If you’re in the market for live-sawn white oak flooring for sale for your next home renovation, give us a call at Hardwood Designs. We push ourselves to create and design products that are one of a kind and innovative for any customer. If you have any questions, call us today.

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